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Items: 1 to 20 of 96

1.

Minimizing respondent attrition in longitudinal research: practical implications from a cohort study of adolescent drinking.

Boys A, Marsden J, Stillwell G, Hatchings K, Griffiths P, Farrell M.

J Adolesc. 2003 Jun;26(3):363-73.

PMID:
12770532
2.

Tracking and follow-up of 16,915 adolescents: minimizing attrition bias.

Morrison TC, Wahlgren DR, Hovell MF, Zakarian J, Burkham-Kreitner S, Hofstetter CR, Slymen DJ, Keating K, Russos S, Jones JA.

Control Clin Trials. 1997 Oct;18(5):383-96.

PMID:
9315423
3.

Telephone-based assessments to minimize missing data in longitudinal depression trials: a project IMPACTS study report.

Claassen C, Kurian B, Trivedi MH, Grannemann BD, Tuli E, Pipes R, Preston AM, Flood A.

Contemp Clin Trials. 2009 Jan;30(1):13-9. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2008.08.001.

4.

Attrition bias in a U.S. Internet survey of alcohol use among college freshmen.

McCoy TP, Ip EH, Blocker JN, Champion H, Rhodes SD, Wagoner KG, Mitra A, Wolfson M.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2009 Jul;70(4):606-14.

5.

Contemporary options for longitudinal follow-up: lessons learned from a cohort of urban adolescents.

Tobler AL, Komro KA.

Eval Program Plann. 2011 May;34(2):87-96. doi: 10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2010.12.002.

6.

Persistence pays off: follow-up methods for difficult-to-track longitudinal samples.

Kleschinsky JH, Bosworth LB, Nelson SE, Walsh EK, Shaffer HJ.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2009 Sep;70(5):751-61.

7.

"Do I really want to do this?" Longitudinal cohort study participants' perspectives on postal survey design: a qualitative study.

Harcombe H, Derrett S, Herbison P, McBride D.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011 Jan 27;11(1):8. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-11-8.

9.

A systematic review of the effect of retention methods in population-based cohort studies.

Booker CL, Harding S, Benzeval M.

BMC Public Health. 2011 Apr 19;11:249. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-249. Review.

10.

Characteristics of people lost to attrition in psychiatric follow-up studies.

Fischer EH, Dornelas EA, Goethe JW.

J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Jan;189(1):49-55.

PMID:
11206665
11.

Novel and emerging strategies for longitudinal data collection.

Udtha M, Nomie K, Yu E, Sanner J.

J Nurs Scholarsh. 2015 Mar;47(2):152-60. doi: 10.1111/jnu.12116. Review.

PMID:
25490868
12.

Professionally designed information materials and telephone reminders improved consent response rates: evidence from an RCT nested within a cohort study.

Boyd A, Tilling K, Cornish R, Davies A, Humphries K, Macleod J.

J Clin Epidemiol. 2015 Aug;68(8):877-87. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.03.014.

13.

Tracing lost research participants.

Donohue L.

Aust J Adv Nurs. 1995 Autumn;12(3):6-10.

PMID:
7786463
14.

Is a history of alcohol problems or of psychiatric disorder associated with attrition at 11-year follow-up?

Bucholz KK, Shayka JJ, Marion SL, Lewis CE, Pribor EF, Rubio DM.

Ann Epidemiol. 1996 May;6(3):228-34.

PMID:
8827158
15.
16.

Predictors of attrition in a longitudinal study of substance abusers.

Claus RE, Kindleberger LR, Dugan MC.

J Psychoactive Drugs. 2002 Jan-Mar;34(1):69-74.

PMID:
12003115
17.

Panel accretion and external validity in adolescent substance use research.

Tebes JK, Snow DL, Ayers TS, Arthur MW.

Eval Rev. 1996 Aug;20(4):470-84.

PMID:
10183258
18.

Recruitment and retention strategies of African American and Latina American breast cancer survivors in a longitudinal psycho-oncology study.

Ashing-Giwa K, Rosales M.

Oncol Nurs Forum. 2012 Sep;39(5):E434-42. doi: 10.1188/12.ONF.E434-E442.

PMID:
22940523
19.

Adult outcomes of binge drinking in adolescence: findings from a UK national birth cohort.

Viner RM, Taylor B.

J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Oct;61(10):902-7.

20.

Strategies to improve retention in randomised trials.

Brueton VC, Tierney J, Stenning S, Harding S, Meredith S, Nazareth I, Rait G.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Dec 3;(12):MR000032. doi: 10.1002/14651858.MR000032.pub2. Review.

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