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Items: 1 to 20 of 163

1.
2.

Sporulation and delta-endotoxin synthesis by Bacillus thuringiensis.

Aronson A.

Cell Mol Life Sci. 2002 Mar;59(3):417-25. Review.

PMID:
11964120
3.

Bacillus thuringiensis: from biodiversity to biotechnology.

Prieto-Samsónov DL, Vázquez-Padrón RI, Ayra-Pardo C, González-Cabrera J, de la Riva GA.

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 1997 Sep;19(3):202-19.

PMID:
9418060
4.

Role of receptor interaction in the mode of action of insecticidal Cry and Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis.

Gómez I, Pardo-López L, Muñoz-Garay C, Fernandez LE, Pérez C, Sánchez J, Soberón M, Bravo A.

Peptides. 2007 Jan;28(1):169-73. Epub 2006 Dec 4. Review.

PMID:
17145116
5.

Histopathological and ultrastructural effects of delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the midgut of Simulium pertinax larvae (Diptera, Simuliidae).

Cavados CF, Majerowicz S, Chaves JQ, Araújo-Coutinho CJ, Rabinovitch L.

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2004 Aug;99(5):493-8. Epub 2004 Nov 3.

6.

Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(a) insecticidal toxin: crystal structure and channel formation.

Grochulski P, Masson L, Borisova S, Pusztai-Carey M, Schwartz JL, Brousseau R, Cygler M.

J Mol Biol. 1995 Dec 1;254(3):447-64.

PMID:
7490762
7.

Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins: molecular mode of action.

Rajamohan F, Lee MK, Dean DH.

Prog Nucleic Acid Res Mol Biol. 1998;60:1-27. Review.

PMID:
9594569
9.

Fate of Bacillus thuringiensis strains in different insect larvae.

Suzuki MT, Lereclus D, Arantes OM.

Can J Microbiol. 2004 Nov;50(11):973-5.

PMID:
15644915
11.

Regulation of the packaging of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins into inclusions.

Chang L, Grant R, Aronson A.

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2001 Nov;67(11):5032-6.

12.

The role of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1C and Cry1E separate structural domains in the interaction with Spodoptera littoralis gut epithelial cells.

Avisar D, Keller M, Gazit E, Prudovsky E, Sneh B, Zilberstein A.

J Biol Chem. 2004 Apr 16;279(16):15779-86. Epub 2004 Feb 12.

13.

Signaling versus punching hole: How do Bacillus thuringiensis toxins kill insect midgut cells?

Soberón M, Gill SS, Bravo A.

Cell Mol Life Sci. 2009 Apr;66(8):1337-49. doi: 10.1007/s00018-008-8330-9. Review.

PMID:
19132293
14.

Current models of the mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins: a critical review.

Vachon V, Laprade R, Schwartz JL.

J Invertebr Pathol. 2012 Sep 15;111(1):1-12. doi: 10.1016/j.jip.2012.05.001. Epub 2012 May 19. Review.

PMID:
22617276
15.

Ion channels formed in planar lipid bilayers by Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in the presence of Manduca sexta midgut receptors.

Schwartz JL, Lu YJ, Söhnlein P, Brousseau R, Laprade R, Masson L, Adang MJ.

FEBS Lett. 1997 Jul 28;412(2):270-6.

16.

Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins: mode of action, insect resistance and consequences for crop protection.

Pardo-López L, Soberón M, Bravo A.

FEMS Microbiol Rev. 2013 Jan;37(1):3-22. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00341.x. Epub 2012 Jun 11. Review.

17.
18.

Binding characteristics to mosquito-larval midgut proteins of the cloned domain II-III fragment from the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin.

Moonsom S, Chaisri U, Kasinrerk W, Angsuthanasombat C.

J Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Sep 30;40(5):783-90.

PMID:
17927913
19.

At least one Bacillus thuringiensis toxin forms ion-selective pores in membranes.

Prince RC.

Trends Biochem Sci. 1990 Jan;15(1):2-3. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
1690468

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