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Items: 1 to 20 of 213

1.

Berry fruits: compositional elements, biochemical activities, and the impact of their intake on human health, performance, and disease.

Seeram NP.

J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Feb 13;56(3):627-9. doi: 10.1021/jf071988k. Epub 2008 Jan 23.

PMID:
18211023
2.

Composition of sugars, organic acids, and total phenolics in 25 wild or cultivated berry species.

Mikulic-Petkovsek M, Schmitzer V, Slatnar A, Stampar F, Veberic R.

J Food Sci. 2012 Oct;77(10):C1064-70. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02896.x. Epub 2012 Aug 27.

PMID:
22924969
3.

Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro.

Seeram NP, Adams LS, Zhang Y, Lee R, Sand D, Scheuller HS, Heber D.

J Agric Food Chem. 2006 Dec 13;54(25):9329-39.

PMID:
17147415
4.

Berry antioxidants: small fruits providing large benefits.

Manganaris GA, Goulas V, Vicente AR, Terry LA.

J Sci Food Agric. 2014 Mar 30;94(5):825-33. doi: 10.1002/jsfa.6432. Epub 2013 Nov 5. Review.

PMID:
24122646
5.

Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.

Skrovankova S, Sumczynski D, Mlcek J, Jurikova T, Sochor J.

Int J Mol Sci. 2015 Oct 16;16(10):24673-706. doi: 10.3390/ijms161024673. Review.

7.

Determination of the bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity and chemical composition of Brazilian blackberry, red raspberry, strawberry, blueberry and sweet cherry fruits.

de Souza VR, Pereira PA, da Silva TL, de Oliveira Lima LC, Pio R, Queiroz F.

Food Chem. 2014 Aug 1;156:362-8. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.01.125. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

PMID:
24629981
8.

Saskatoon and wild blueberries have higher anthocyanin contents than other Manitoba berries.

Hosseinian FS, Beta T.

J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Dec 26;55(26):10832-8. Epub 2007 Dec 5.

PMID:
18052240
9.

Berries and human health: research highlights from the Fifth Biennial Berry Health Benefits Symposium.

Seeram NP.

J Agric Food Chem. 2014 May 7;62(18):3839-41. doi: 10.1021/jf404349f. Epub 2013 Nov 4.

PMID:
24148006
10.
11.

Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens.

Puupponen-Pimiä R, Nohynek L, Hartmann-Schmidlin S, Kähkönen M, Heinonen M, Määttä-Riihinen K, Oksman-Caldentey KM.

J Appl Microbiol. 2005;98(4):991-1000.

12.

Inhibition of protein and lipid oxidation in liposomes by berry phenolics.

Viljanen K, Kylli P, Kivikari R, Heinonen M.

J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Dec 1;52(24):7419-24.

PMID:
15563229
13.
14.

Phytochemical composition and metabolic performance-enhancing activity of dietary berries traditionally used by Native North Americans.

Burns Kraft TF, Dey M, Rogers RB, Ribnicky DM, Gipp DM, Cefalu WT, Raskin I, Lila MA.

J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Feb 13;56(3):654-60. doi: 10.1021/jf071999d. Epub 2008 Jan 23.

15.

Berry phenolics and their antioxidant activity.

Kähkönen MP, Hopia AI, Heinonen M.

J Agric Food Chem. 2001 Aug;49(8):4076-82.

PMID:
11513713
16.

Plant phenolics affect oxidation of tryptophan.

Salminen H, Heinonen M.

J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 27;56(16):7472-81. doi: 10.1021/jf800708t. Epub 2008 Jul 23.

PMID:
18646765
17.

Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and suppression of TNF-induced activation of NFkappaB by edible berry juice.

Boivin D, Blanchette M, Barrette S, Moghrabi A, Béliveau R.

Anticancer Res. 2007 Mar-Apr;27(2):937-48.

18.

Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens.

Nohynek LJ, Alakomi HL, Kähkönen MP, Heinonen M, Helander IM, Oksman-Caldentey KM, Puupponen-Pimiä RH.

Nutr Cancer. 2006;54(1):18-32.

PMID:
16800770
19.
20.

Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries.

Seeram NP, Momin RA, Nair MG, Bourquin LD.

Phytomedicine. 2001 Sep;8(5):362-9.

PMID:
11695879

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