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Hypertension. 1997 Nov;30(5):1020-4.

Antecedent hypertension confers increased risk for adverse outcomes after initial myocardial infarction.

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1
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study, Mass 01701, USA.

Abstract

Several studies have examined the association of blood pressure (BP) after myocardial infarction (MI) with a risk for adverse outcome; however, few studies have investigated prognosis after MI as a function of BP before MI. Our goal was to examine the relation of antecedent hypertension to risk of adverse outcomes after initial MI. From 1967 to 1990, 404 subjects followed at the Framingham Heart Study developed an initial MI. These subjects were classified on the basis of preinfarction BP into normotensive (BP<140/90 mm Hg and not receiving antihypertensive treatment; n=118), stage I-untreated hypertension (BP 140 to 159/90 to 99 mm Hg; n=89), and stage II to IV or treated hypertension (BP > or =160/100 mm Hg or treated hypertension; n=197). Cox models were used to adjust for age, sex, smoking, glucose intolerance, total cholesterol, and prior cardiovascular disease. Antecedent hypertension was related to risk of adverse outcome after MI. Compared with normotensive individuals, stage II to IV hypertensives were at increased risk for reinfarction (hazard ratio [HR], 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20 to 4.04). A similar but nonsignificant association was seen in stage I hypertensives (HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 0.97 to 3.77). Stage II to IV hypertensives were at increased risk for all-cause mortality compared with normotensive persons (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.98). Thus, even after MI, a history of antecedent hypertension remains predictive of adverse outcome. These findings are consistent with beneficial effects of BP control in primary and secondary prevention settings. Effective BP control may both reduce the risk for an initial MI and improve outcome in the event that an MI occurs.

PMID:
9369249
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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