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Neuron. 2018 Oct 24;100(2):490-509. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2018.10.002.

What Is a Cognitive Map? Organizing Knowledge for Flexible Behavior.

Author information

1
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK; Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG. Electronic address: behrens@fmrib.ox.ac.uk.
2
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.
3
Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG.
4
DeepMind, London, UK.
5
DeepMind, London, UK; Max Planck-UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, University College London, London, UK.

Abstract

It is proposed that a cognitive map encoding the relationships between entities in the world supports flexible behavior, but the majority of the neural evidence for such a system comes from studies of spatial navigation. Recent work describing neuronal parallels between spatial and non-spatial behaviors has rekindled the notion of a systematic organization of knowledge across multiple domains. We review experimental evidence and theoretical frameworks that point to principles unifying these apparently disparate functions. These principles describe how to learn and use abstract, generalizable knowledge and suggest that map-like representations observed in a spatial context may be an instance of general coding mechanisms capable of organizing knowledge of all kinds. We highlight how artificial agents endowed with such principles exhibit flexible behavior and learn map-like representations observed in the brain. Finally, we speculate on how these principles may offer insight into the extreme generalizations, abstractions, and inferences that characterize human cognition.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive Map; Decision Making; Generalization; Hippocampal Formation; Inference; Prefrontal Cortex; Reinforcement Learning; Spatial Cognition; Statistical Learning; Structure Learning

PMID:
30359611
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2018.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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