Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transl Psychiatry. 2018 May 10;8(1):96. doi: 10.1038/s41398-018-0107-9.

Transcriptome analysis in whole blood reveals increased microbial diversity in schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
2
Department of Computer, Science University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Institute for Quantitative and Computational Biosciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
4
Davis Genome Center, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
5
Mathematics Department, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
9
Department of Human Genetics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
10
Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
11
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Immunobiology Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
12
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
13
Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ophoff@ucla.edu.
14
Department of Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. ophoff@ucla.edu.
15
Department of Human Genetics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ophoff@ucla.edu.

Abstract

The role of the human microbiome in health and disease is increasingly appreciated. We studied the composition of microbial communities present in blood across 192 individuals, including healthy controls and patients with three disorders affecting the brain: schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and bipolar disorder. By using high-quality unmapped RNA sequencing reads as candidate microbial reads, we performed profiling of microbial transcripts detected in whole blood. We were able to detect a wide range of bacterial and archaeal phyla in blood. Interestingly, we observed an increased microbial diversity in schizophrenia patients compared to the three other groups. We replicated this finding in an independent schizophrenia case-control cohort. This increased diversity is inversely correlated with estimated cell abundance of a subpopulation of CD8+ memory T cells in healthy controls, supporting a link between microbial products found in blood, immunity and schizophrenia.

PMID:
29743478
PMCID:
PMC5943399
DOI:
10.1038/s41398-018-0107-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center