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Epilepsy Behav. 2018 Jun;83:113-118. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.02.030. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards epilepsy among general practitioners in rural Bolivia: Results before and after a training program on epilepsy.

Author information

1
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "G.F. Ingrassia", Section of Neurosciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
2
Center of Anthropological Researches of the Teko Guaraní, Gutierrez, Bolivia.
3
The Bolivian League Against Epilepsy, Santa Cruz, Bolivia.
4
Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
5
Hospital Universitario Hernández Vera, Santa Cruz, Bolivia.
6
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "G.F. Ingrassia", Section of Neurosciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. Electronic address: anicolet@unict.it.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Epilepsy represents a major health problem in low- and middle-income countries where treatment gap (TG) levels are high. The reduction of epilepsy TG in the rural area of the Chaco region, Plurinational State of Bolivia, has been the aim of many projects based on the reinforcement of the primary care setting. To plan educational campaigns directed to the healthcare professionals, it is necessary to establish their baseline knowledge level. The objective of our study was to assess the baseline level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards epilepsy among general practitioners (GPs) of the rural communities of the Chaco region.

METHODS:

The study was conducted in three departments of Bolivia. All the GPs living in these areas were invited to participate in the study consisting of two training modules six months apart from each other, each with two-day duration. They answered a validated questionnaire to evaluate the KAP towards epilepsy before and after the courses.

RESULTS:

Fifty GPs [30 men (60%); mean age: 32.1±5.8years] participated in the first training course. After six months, 31 GPs (62%) [19 men (61.3%); mean age: 33±5.0years] participated in the second module. Before the training, the majority of GPs declared a low level of satisfaction about their epilepsy knowledge, which improved after the courses. A change in practices was recorded after the training, with an increased confidence to manage antiepileptic treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Our study showed the significant impact of specific training programs on epilepsy among GPs.

KEYWORDS:

Epilepsy; Health promotion; Tropical health

PMID:
29694941
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.02.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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