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Nat Commun. 2018 Apr 19;9(1):1557. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03968-5.

Culturing of female bladder bacteria reveals an interconnected urogenital microbiota.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA.
2
Host-Microbiota Interactions Laboratory, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK.
3
Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia.
4
Department of Molecular and Translational Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia.
5
Department of Urology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA.
6
Department of Biology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60660, USA.
7
Department of Computer Science, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60660, USA.
8
Bioinformatics Program, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60660, USA.
9
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA. awolfe@luc.edu.
10
Host-Microbiota Interactions Laboratory, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. tl2@sanger.ac.uk.

Abstract

Metagenomic analyses have indicated that the female bladder harbors an indigenous microbiota. However, there are few cultured reference strains with sequenced genomes available for functional and experimental analyses. Here we isolate and genome-sequence 149 bacterial strains from catheterized urine of 77 women. This culture collection spans 78 species, representing approximately two thirds of the bacterial diversity within the sampled bladders, including Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Detailed genomic and functional comparison of the bladder microbiota to the gastrointestinal and vaginal microbiotas demonstrates similar vaginal and bladder microbiota, with functional capacities that are distinct from those observed in the gastrointestinal microbiota. Whole-genome phylogenetic analysis of bacterial strains isolated from the vagina and bladder in the same women identifies highly similar Escherichia coli, Streptococcus anginosus, Lactobacillus iners, and Lactobacillus crispatus, suggesting an interlinked female urogenital microbiota that is not only limited to pathogens but is also characteristic of health-associated commensals.

PMID:
29674608
PMCID:
PMC5908796
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-03968-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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