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Science. 2018 Mar 30;359(6383):1524-1527. doi: 10.1126/science.aao0702. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Hippocampal ripples down-regulate synapses.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Laboratory for Systems Neurophysiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama, Japan.
3
Department of Morphological Brain Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
4
Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Laboratory for Systems Neurophysiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama, Japan. yuji@ikegaya.jp fujisawa@brain.riken.jp.
6
Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. yuji@ikegaya.jp fujisawa@brain.riken.jp.
7
Center for Information and Neural Networks, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

The specific effects of sleep on synaptic plasticity remain unclear. We report that mouse hippocampal sharp-wave ripple oscillations serve as intrinsic events that trigger long-lasting synaptic depression. Silencing of sharp-wave ripples during slow-wave states prevented the spontaneous down-regulation of net synaptic weights and impaired the learning of new memories. The synaptic down-regulation was dependent on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and selective for a specific input pathway. Thus, our findings are consistent with the role of slow-wave states in refining memory engrams by reducing recent memory-irrelevant neuronal activity and suggest a previously unrecognized function for sharp-wave ripples.

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PMID:
29439023
DOI:
10.1126/science.aao0702
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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