Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroimage. 2018 Feb 15;167:309-315. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.11.041. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Neuroanatomical substrate of noise sensitivity.

Author information

1
Center for Music in the Brain (MIB), Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University & The Royal Academy of Music Aarhus/Aalborg (RAMA), Aarhus, Denmark; Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: marina.kliuchko@clin.au.dk.
2
Department of Mathematical Information Technology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
3
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
4
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Cicero Learning, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
5
Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
6
Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
7
Center for Music in the Brain (MIB), Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University & The Royal Academy of Music Aarhus/Aalborg (RAMA), Aarhus, Denmark; AMI Centre, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.

Abstract

Recent functional studies suggest that noise sensitivity, a trait describing attitudes towards noise and predicting noise annoyance, is associated with altered processing in the central auditory system. In the present work, we examined whether noise sensitivity could be related to the structural anatomy of auditory and limbic brain areas. Anatomical MR brain images of 80 subjects were parcellated with FreeSurfer to measure grey matter volume, cortical thickness, cortical area and folding index of anatomical structures in the temporal lobe and insular cortex. The grey matter volume of amygdala and hippocampus was measured as well. According to our findings, noise sensitivity is associated with the grey matter volume in the selected structures. Among those, we propose and discuss particular areas, previously linked to auditory perceptual, emotional and interoceptive processing, in which larger grey matter volume seems to be related to higher noise sensitivity.

KEYWORDS:

Anatomical MRI; Auditory cortex; Hippocampus; Noise sensitivity; Right anterior insula

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center