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Cell Rep. 2017 Nov 21;21(8):2082-2089. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.10.122.

Triple Function of Synaptotagmin 7 Ensures Efficiency of High-Frequency Transmission at Central GABAergic Synapses.

Author information

1
IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria), Am Campus 1, A-3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria.
2
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Research Group Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Function, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA.
3
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Research Group Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Function, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA; Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Department of Otolaryngology, Iowa Neuroscience Institute, Aging Mind Brain Initiative, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
4
IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria), Am Campus 1, A-3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria. Electronic address: peter.jonas@ist.ac.at.

Abstract

Synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7) is thought to be a Ca2+ sensor that mediates asynchronous transmitter release and facilitation at synapses. However, Syt7 is strongly expressed in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons, and the output synapses of these neurons produce only minimal asynchronous release and show depression rather than facilitation. To resolve this apparent contradiction, we examined the effects of genetic elimination of Syt7 on synaptic transmission at the GABAergic basket cell (BC)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapse in cerebellum. Our results indicate that at the BC-PC synapse, Syt7 contributes to asynchronous release, pool replenishment, and facilitation. In combination, these three effects ensure efficient transmitter release during high-frequency activity and guarantee frequency independence of inhibition. Our results identify a distinct function of Syt7: ensuring the efficiency of high-frequency inhibitory synaptic transmission.

KEYWORDS:

Ca(2+) sensor; GABAergic synapses; basket cells; cerebellum; endocytosis; exocytosis; fast spiking; pool replenishment; sustained release; synaptotagmin; transmitter release

PMID:
29166601
PMCID:
PMC5863544
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2017.10.122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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