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Brain Inj. 2017;31(13-14):1856-1862. doi: 10.1080/02699052.2017.1358395. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

Brain-Derived Microparticles in Patients with Severe Isolated TBI.

Author information

1
a Karolinska Institutet, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care , Karolinska University Hospital Solna , Stockholm , Sweden.
2
b Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, section for Neurosurgery , Karolinska University Hospital Solna , Stockholm , Sweden.
3
c Karolinska Institutet , Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Danderyds Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
4
d Karolinska Institutet , Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit , Stockholm , Sweden.

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

to investigate the presence of circulating microparticles (MPs) of brain tissue origin in the systemic and cerebrovenous blood of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Prospective observational study in 15 consecutive patients with severe isolated TBI.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

We repeatedly measured concentrations of MPs expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4), in arterial and cerebrovenous blood at admittance to hospital and up to 72 hours after the injury.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

Concentrations of MPs expressing GFAP and AQP4 were significantly higher in the TBI group compared with healthy controls: GFAP 2.0 [1.1-7.9] vs. 1.3 [1-2.1] × 106/mL, p < 0.001; AQP4 0.1 [0.07-0.22] vs. 0.08 [0.06-0.11] × 106/mL, p < 0.001 (median, range). No transcranial gradients were found. Levels of NSE-expressing MPs were also higher in the TBI group compared with healthy controls: 0.4 [0.25-2.1] vs. 0.26 [0.13-0.98] × 106/mL, p < 0.05; however, regarding NSE-positive non-platelet MPs, there were no differences between patients and controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with TBI have higher numbers of brain-derived MPs. Further studies are needed, however, to identify specific and sensitive MP markers of brain injury.

KEYWORDS:

cerebrovenous blood; clinical study; microparticles; traumatic brain injury

PMID:
28972406
DOI:
10.1080/02699052.2017.1358395
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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