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Trends Microbiol. 2018 Jan;26(1):70-85. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2017.07.004. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Archaea Are Interactive Components of Complex Microbiomes.

Author information

1
Medical University Graz, Internal Medicine, Graz, Austria; BioTechMed, Graz, Austria. Electronic address: christine.moissl-eichinger@medunigraz.at.
2
Medical University Graz, Internal Medicine, Graz, Austria.
3
TU Graz, Environmental Biotechnology, Graz, Austria.
4
Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Recent findings have shaken our picture of the biology of the archaea and revealed novel traits beyond archaeal extremophily and supposed 'primitiveness'. The archaea constitute a considerable fraction of the Earth's ecosystems, and their potential to shape their surroundings by a profound interaction with their biotic and abiotic environment has been recognized. Moreover, archaea have been identified as a substantial component, or even as keystone species, in complex microbiomes - in the environment or accompanying a holobiont. Species of the Euryarchaeota (methanogens, halophiles) and Thaumarchaeota, in particular, have the capacity to coexist in plant, animal, and human microbiomes, where syntrophy allows them to thrive under energy-deficiency stress. Due to methodological limitations, the archaeome remains mysterious, and many questions with respect to potential pathogenicity, function, and structural interactions with their host and other microorganisms remain.

KEYWORDS:

Archaea; archaeome; microbial interaction; microbiome; syntrophy

PMID:
28826642
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2017.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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