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Cell Rep. 2017 Jun 6;19(10):2130-2142. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.05.044.

Distinct Thalamic Reticular Cell Types Differentially Modulate Normal and Pathological Cortical Rhythms.

Author information

1
Neurosciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
2
Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
3
Laboratory of Thalamus Research, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary; Department of Anatomy, Histology, and Embryology, Semmelweis University, Budapest 1094, Hungary.
4
Bioengineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
5
Laboratory of Thalamus Research, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary.
6
Neurosciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Electronic address: jeanne.paz@gladstone.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Integrative brain functions depend on widely distributed, rhythmically coordinated computations. Through its long-ranging connections with cortex and most senses, the thalamus orchestrates the flow of cognitive and sensory information. Essential in this process, the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT) gates different information streams through its extensive inhibition onto other thalamic nuclei, however, we lack an understanding of how different inhibitory neuron subpopulations in nRT function as gatekeepers. We dissociated the connectivity, physiology, and circuit functions of neurons within rodent nRT, based on parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) expression, and validated the existence of such populations in human nRT. We found that PV, but not SOM, cells are rhythmogenic, and that PV and SOM neurons are connected to and modulate distinct thalamocortical circuits. Notably, PV, but not SOM, neurons modulate somatosensory behavior and disrupt seizures. These results provide a conceptual framework for how nRT may gate incoming information to modulate brain-wide rhythms.

KEYWORDS:

TRN; inhibitory neurons; nRT; optogenetic control of seizures; parvalbumin; reticular thalamic nucleus; seizures; somatosensory; somatostatin; thalamocortical oscillations

PMID:
28591583
PMCID:
PMC5557038
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2017.05.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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