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Nature. 2017 May 31;546(7656):73-81. doi: 10.1038/nature22900.

Future threats to biodiversity and pathways to their prevention.

Author information

1
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA.
2
Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA.
3
Natural Resources Science and Management, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA.
4
Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA.
5
Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Tubney, Oxfordshire OX13 5QL, UK.
6
School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg Campus, Scottsville 3209, South Africa.

Abstract

Tens of thousands of species are threatened with extinction as a result of human activities. Here we explore how the extinction risks of terrestrial mammals and birds might change in the next 50 years. Future population growth and economic development are forecasted to impose unprecedented levels of extinction risk on many more species worldwide, especially the large mammals of tropical Africa, Asia and South America. Yet these threats are not inevitable. Proactive international efforts to increase crop yields, minimize land clearing and habitat fragmentation, and protect natural lands could increase food security in developing nations and preserve much of Earth's remaining biodiversity.

PMID:
28569796
DOI:
10.1038/nature22900
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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