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J Affect Disord. 2017 Aug 1;217:289-294. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2017.04.017. Epub 2017 Apr 18.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is effective in misophonia: An open trial.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center (AMC), University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.e.schroder@amc.nl.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center (AMC), University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center (AMC), University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: d.denys@amc.nl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Misophonia is a psychiatric disorder in which ordinary human sounds like smacking or chewing provoke intense anger and disgust. Despite the high burden of this condition, to date there is no evidence-based treatment available. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and investigated whether clinical or demographic characteristics predicted treatment response.

METHODS:

Ninety patients with misophonia received eight bi-weekly group CBT sessions. Treatment response was defined as a Clinical Global Impression - Improvement Scale (CGI-I) score at endpoint of 1 or 2 (very much or much improved) and a 30% or greater reduction on the Amsterdam Misophonia Scale (A-MISO-S), a measure of the severity of misophonia symptoms.

RESULTS:

Following treatment 48% (N=42) of the patients showed a significant reduction of misophonia symptoms. Severity of misophonia and the presence of disgust were positive predictors of treatment response.

LIMITATIONS:

The A-MISO-S is not a validated scale. Furthermore, this was an open-label study with a waiting list control condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first treatment study for misophonia. Our results suggest that CBT is effective in half of the patients.

KEYWORDS:

Aggression; Anger; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Disgust; Misophonia; Sound

PMID:
28441620
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2017.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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