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Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2017 Apr 7;7:114. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00114. eCollection 2017.

Tick-Pathogen Interactions and Vector Competence: Identification of Molecular Drivers for Tick-Borne Diseases.

Author information

1
SaBio. Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos CSIC-UCLM-JCCMCiudad Real, Spain.
2
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State UniversityStillwater, OK, USA.
3
Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de LisboaLisboa, Portugal.
4
UMR BIPAR INRA-ANSES-ENVAMaisons-Alfort, France.
5
Biology Centre, Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of ParasitologyCeske Budejovice, Czechia.
6
Faculty of Science, University of South BohemiaČeské Budějovice, Czechia.
7
Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de ZaragozaZaragoza, Spain.
8
Animal and Plant Health AgencySurrey, UK.
9
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of SurreyGuildford, UK.
10
Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of LiverpoolLiverpool, UK.
11
Institute for Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universität BerlinBerlin, Germany.
12
Department of Microbiology, Medical School, Aristotle University of ThessalonikiThessaloniki, Greece.
13
National Center of Reference for Anaplasma, Babesia, Rickettsia and Theileria, Intituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della SiciliaSicily, Italy.

Abstract

Ticks and the pathogens they transmit constitute a growing burden for human and animal health worldwide. Vector competence is a component of vectorial capacity and depends on genetic determinants affecting the ability of a vector to transmit a pathogen. These determinants affect traits such as tick-host-pathogen and susceptibility to pathogen infection. Therefore, the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tick-pathogen interactions that affect vector competence is essential for the identification of molecular drivers for tick-borne diseases. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of tick-pathogen molecular interactions for bacteria, viruses, and protozoa affecting human and animal health. Additionally, the impact of tick microbiome on these interactions was considered. Results show that different pathogens evolved similar strategies such as manipulation of the immune response to infect vectors and facilitate multiplication and transmission. Furthermore, some of these strategies may be used by pathogens to infect both tick and mammalian hosts. Identification of interactions that promote tick survival, spread, and pathogen transmission provides the opportunity to disrupt these interactions and lead to a reduction in tick burden and the prevalence of tick-borne diseases. Targeting some of the similar mechanisms used by the pathogens for infection and transmission by ticks may assist in development of preventative strategies against multiple tick-borne diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Anaplasma; Babesia; Borrelia; flavivirus; immunology; microbiome; tick; vaccine

PMID:
28439499
PMCID:
PMC5383669
DOI:
10.3389/fcimb.2017.00114
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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