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Trends Immunol. 2017 Mar;38(3):194-205. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2016.12.004. Epub 2017 Jan 7.

Crosstalk between Cytoplasmic RIG-I and STING Sensing Pathways.

Author information

1
Istituto Pasteur - Italia, Istituto Pasteur - Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome, Italy.
2
Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus Research Center for Innate Immunology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
3
Istituto Pasteur - Italia, Istituto Pasteur - Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: john.hiscott@istitutopasteur.it.

Abstract

Detection of evolutionarily conserved molecules on microbial pathogens by host immune sensors represents the initial trigger of the immune response against infection. Cytosolic receptors sense viral and intracellular bacterial genomes, as well as nucleic acids produced during replication. Once activated, these sensors trigger multiple signaling cascades, converging on the production of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines. Although distinct classes of receptors are responsible for the RNA and DNA sensing, the downstream signaling components are physically and functionally interconnected. This review highlights the importance of the crosstalk between retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS) RNA sensing and the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)- stimulator of interferon genes (STING) DNA sensing pathways in potentiating efficient antiviral responses. The potential of cGAS-STING manipulation as a component of cancer immunotherapy is also reviewed.

PMID:
28073693
PMCID:
PMC5329138
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2016.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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