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Sci Rep. 2016 Dec 15;6:39236. doi: 10.1038/srep39236.

A window into the brain mechanisms associated with noise sensitivity.

Author information

1
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FI-00014, Finland.
2
BioMag Laboratory, HUS Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, FI-00029, Finland.
3
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FI-00014, Finland.
4
Center for Music in the Brain (MIB), Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, DK-8000, Denmark.
5
Cicero Learning, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FI-00014, Finland.

Abstract

Noise sensitive individuals are more likely to experience negative emotions from unwanted sounds and they show greater susceptibility to adverse effects of noise on health. Noise sensitivity does not originate from dysfunctions of the peripheral auditory system, and it is thus far unknown whether and how it relates to abnormalities of auditory processing in the central nervous system. We conducted a combined electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (M/EEG) study to measure neural sound feature processing in the central auditory system in relation to the individual noise sensitivity. Our results show that high noise sensitivity is associated with altered sound feature encoding and attenuated discrimination of sound noisiness in the auditory cortex. This finding makes a step towards objective measures of noise sensitivity instead of self-evaluation questionnaires and the development of strategies to prevent negative effects of noise on the susceptible population.

PMID:
27976708
PMCID:
PMC5157031
DOI:
10.1038/srep39236
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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