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Lancet. 2017 Feb 25;389(10071):847-860. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31392-7. Epub 2016 Nov 1.

The global burden of women's cancers: a grand challenge in global health.

Author information

1
Women's College Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: ophira.ginsburg@wchospital.ca.
2
Cancer Surveillance Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
3
Cancer Survival Group, Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
4
National Center for Radiotherapy, Korlebu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana.
5
Cancer Institute Ion Chiricuta, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
6
Institute for Global Health Equity and Innovation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
7
James P Grant School of Public Health, BRAC University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
8
Hanoi Medical University and National Institute for Cancer Control, Hanoi, Vietnam.
9
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
10
Queen's University Faculty of Health Sciences, Office of Global Health, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
11
Global Focus on Cancer, Port Chester, NY, USA.
12
Independent Global Health Specialist, Washington, DC, USA.
13
Research Triangle Institute Global India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, India; St John's Research Institute, Bengarulu, India.
14
Institute of Cancer Policy, King's Health Partners Comprehensive Cancer Centre, London, UK; King's Centre for Global Health, King's Health Partners and King's College London, UK.
15
Ocean Road Cancer Centre, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
16
School of Public Health and Administration, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
17
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
18
Health Economics Group, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Abstract

Every year, more than 2 million women worldwide are diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer, yet where a woman lives, her socioeconomic status, and agency largely determines whether she will develop one of these cancers and will ultimately survive. In regions with scarce resources, fragile or fragmented health systems, cancer contributes to the cycle of poverty. Proven and cost-effective interventions are available for both these common cancers, yet for so many women access to these is beyond reach. These inequities highlight the urgent need in low-income and middle-income countries for sustainable investments in the entire continuum of cancer control, from prevention to palliative care, and in the development of high-quality population-based cancer registries. In this first paper of the Series on health, equity, and women's cancers, we describe the burden of breast and cervical cancer, with an emphasis on global and regional trends in incidence, mortality, and survival, and the consequences, especially in socioeconomically disadvantaged women in different settings.

PMID:
27814965
PMCID:
PMC6191029
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31392-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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