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Mol Biosyst. 2016 Aug 16;12(9):2798-817. doi: 10.1039/c6mb00069j.

Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. vuversky@health.usf.edu.
2
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4, Canada.
3
Department of Computer Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219, USA. lkurgan@vcu.edu.
4
Department of Molecular Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. vuversky@health.usf.edu and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Research Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA and Biology Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia and Laboratory of Structural Dynamics, Stability and Folding of Proteins, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064, Russia.

Abstract

Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy.

PMID:
27377881
DOI:
10.1039/c6mb00069j
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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