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J Immunol. 2016 Jun 15;196(12):4839-47. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1600279.

The Lung Microbiome, Immunity, and the Pathogenesis of Chronic Lung Disease.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; and.
2
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 bmoore@umich.edu.

Abstract

The development of culture-independent techniques for microbiological analysis has uncovered the previously unappreciated complexity of the bacterial microbiome at various anatomic sites. The microbiome of the lung has relatively less bacterial biomass when compared with the lower gastrointestinal tract yet displays considerable diversity. The composition of the lung microbiome is determined by elimination, immigration, and relative growth within its communities. Chronic lung disease alters these factors. Many forms of chronic lung disease demonstrate exacerbations that drive disease progression and are poorly understood. Mounting evidence supports ways in which microbiota dysbiosis can influence host defense and immunity, and in turn may contribute to disease exacerbations. Thus, the key to understanding the pathogenesis of chronic lung disease may reside in deciphering the complex interactions between the host, pathogen, and resident microbiota during stable disease and exacerbations. In this brief review we discuss new insights into these labyrinthine relationships.

PMID:
27260767
PMCID:
PMC4894335
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1600279
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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