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Sci Rep. 2016 May 12;6:25982. doi: 10.1038/srep25982.

Bacterial and archaeal communities in the deep-sea sediments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge.

Author information

1
Marine Science &Technology Institute Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, No. 196 Huayang West Road, Hanjiang District Yangzhou City, Jiangsu Province, 225127, China.
2
College of Plant Protection, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding City, Hebei Province 071001, China.
3
Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents harbor abundant thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms. However, microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents have not been well documented. Here, we investigated bacterial and archaeal communities in the two deep-sea sediments (named as TVG4 and TVG11) collected from inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge using the high-throughput sequencing technology of Illumina MiSeq2500 platform. Based on the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, sequence analysis showed that bacterial communities in the two samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Furthermore, archaeal communities in the two samples were dominated by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Comparative analysis showed that (i) TVG4 displayed the higher bacterial richness and lower archaeal richness than TVG11; (ii) the two samples had more divergence in archaeal communities than bacterial communities. Bacteria and archaea that are potentially associated with nitrogen, sulfur metal and methane cycling were detected in the two samples. Overall, we first provided a comparative picture of bacterial and archaeal communities and revealed their potentially ecological roles in the deep-sea environments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest Indian Ridge, augmenting microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents.

PMID:
27169490
PMCID:
PMC4864381
DOI:
10.1038/srep25982
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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