Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Virol J. 2016 Mar 31;13:56. doi: 10.1186/s12985-016-0513-7.

A heat-inactivated H7N3 vaccine induces cross-reactive cellular immunity in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice.

Author information

1
Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-Mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161, Rome, Italy.
2
Department of Biology and Biotechnology "Charles Darwin", Sapienza University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy.
3
Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-Mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161, Rome, Italy. mariarita.castrucci@iss.it.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cross-reactive immunity against heterologous strains of influenza virus has the potential to provide partial protection in individuals that lack the proper neutralizing antibodies. In particular, the boosting of memory CD8+ T cell responses to conserved viral proteins can attenuate disease severity caused by influenza virus antigenic variants or pandemic strains. However, little is yet known about which of these conserved internal antigens would better induce and/or recall memory CD8+ T cells after in vivo administration of an inactivated whole virus vaccine.

METHODS:

We explored the CD8 + T cell responses to selected epitopes of the internal proteins of an H7N3 influenza virus that were cross-reactive with A/PR/8/34 virus in HLA-A2.1 transgenic (AAD) mice.

RESULTS:

CD8+ T cells against dominant and subdominant epitopes were detected upon infection of mice with live H7N3 virus, whereas immunization with non-replicating virus elicited CD8+ T cell responses against mostly immunodominant epitopes, which were rapidly recalled following infection with A/PR/8/34 virus. These vaccine-induced T cell responses were able to reduce the lung viral load in mice challenged intranasally with the heterologous influenza virus.

CONCLUSIONS:

A single immunization with non-replicating influenza virus vaccines may be able to elicit or recall cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses to conserved immunodominant epitopes and, to some extent, counteract an infection by heterologous virus.

PMID:
27036323
PMCID:
PMC4815128
DOI:
10.1186/s12985-016-0513-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center