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Science. 2016 Mar 11;351(6278):1192-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aad1431. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Early-branching gut fungi possess a large, comprehensive array of biomass-degrading enzymes.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.
2
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02143, USA.
3
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute, 2800 Mitchell Drive, Walnut Creek, CA 94598, USA.
4
Earth and Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA.
5
Earth and Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA.
6
Animal Production, Welfare and Veterinary Sciences, Harper Adams University, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB, UK.
7
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA. momalley@engineering.ucsb.edu.

Abstract

The fungal kingdom is the source of almost all industrial enzymes in use for lignocellulose bioprocessing. We developed a systems-level approach that integrates transcriptomic sequencing, proteomics, phenotype, and biochemical studies of relatively unexplored basal fungi. Anaerobic gut fungi isolated from herbivores produce a large array of biomass-degrading enzymes that synergistically degrade crude, untreated plant biomass and are competitive with optimized commercial preparations from Aspergillus and Trichoderma. Compared to these model platforms, gut fungal enzymes are unbiased in substrate preference due to a wealth of xylan-degrading enzymes. These enzymes are universally catabolite-repressed and are further regulated by a rich landscape of noncoding regulatory RNAs. Additionally, we identified several promising sequence-divergent enzyme candidates for lignocellulosic bioprocessing.

Comment in

PMID:
26912365
PMCID:
PMC5098331
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad1431
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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