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Acta Neurochir Suppl. 2016;121:23-8. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-18497-5_5.

Hypoxia and Inflammation-Induced Disruptions of the Blood-Brain and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barriers Assessed Using a Novel T1-Based MRI Method.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive, N.W., Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada.
2
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
3
Department of Physiology, Umm-Alqura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.
4
General Electric, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive, N.W., Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada. dunnj@ucalgary.ca.
6
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. dunnj@ucalgary.ca.
7
Experimental Imaging Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. dunnj@ucalgary.ca.

Abstract

Subtle blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is involved in numerous neurological conditions. This disruption is found diffusely in the brain and requires quantitative methods for assessment. We propose a statistical method to identify individual voxels where the BBB is disrupted using T1-weighted MRI. We used models of severe and focal vs. mild and generalized disruption of the BBB to show proof of principle with the cold injury model, hypoxia, and a model of inflammation using low- and high-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Using voxel-based analysis, we found that mild hypoxia resulted in diffuse disruption of the BBB, whereas more severe hypoxia and high-dose LPS treatment resulted in prominent leakage, particularly in the periventricular area, suggestive of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier disruption. Our data suggest that the periventricular area may be compromised first in conditions of inflammation and hypoxia. Voxel-based analysis could be used in future studies assessing subtle blood-CSF or BBB disruption.

KEYWORDS:

Blood-brain barrier; Blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier; Hypoxia; Inflammation; Lipopolysaccharide; MRI; Periventricular; Sodium fluorescein

PMID:
26463918
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-18497-5_5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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