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J Neuroimmunol. 2015 Oct 15;287:93-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2015.08.014. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

The spectrum of autoimmune encephalopathies.

Author information

1
Parkland Memorial Hospital, 5201 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, USA; Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, USA.
2
Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, USA.
3
Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, USA; Neurology Section, VA North Texas Health Care System, Medical Service, Dallas, TX, USA; Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universit√§t M√ľnchen, Germany.

Abstract

Despite being a potentially reversible neurological condition, no clear guidelines for diagnosis or management of autoimmune encephalitis exist. In this study we analyzed clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging characteristics, and outcome of autoimmune encephalitis from three teaching hospitals. Non-paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against membrane antigens was the most common syndrome, especially in the pediatric population. Clinical outcome was better for patients with shorter latency from symptom onset to diagnosis and initiation of immunomodulation. Patients with underlying malignancy were less likely to respond well to immunomodulatory therapy. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis is fairly broad, but prompt recognition and treatment often leads to excellent outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Autoimmune; Encephalitis; Limbic encephalitis; Paraneoplastic; Seizure

PMID:
26439968
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneuroim.2015.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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