Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2016 Feb;26:1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.coph.2015.09.001. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

Role of microRNAs in the regulation of innate immune cells under neuroinflammatory conditions.

Author information

1
CNC - Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
2
CNC - Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; Doctoral Programme in Experimental Biology and Biomedicine, CNC - Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
3
CNC - Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address: mdelima@ci.uc.pt.

Abstract

MiRNAs are short, evolutionary conserved noncoding RNA molecules with the ability to control the magnitude of inflammation. The immunosuppressive nature of the brain is sustained by miRNA-dependent regulation of microglial cells, which become activated under neuroinflammatory conditions, such as brain injury and neurodegeneration. The pro-inflammatory and suppressive role of the most studied neuroimmune miRNAs, miR-155 and miR-146a, has been recently challenged. Although the molecular targets of these miRNAs remain unchanged across brain diseases, different kinetics of miRNA expression and degradation can produce different immune outcomes and change microglia phenotypes. Here, we discuss current knowledge regarding the implications of disruption of miRNA networks in neuroinflammation and in the pathophysiology of acute and chronic CNS diseases.

PMID:
26410391
DOI:
10.1016/j.coph.2015.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center