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Front Plant Sci. 2015 Aug 11;6:563. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2015.00563. eCollection 2015.

Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects.

Author information

1
Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya Mohanpur, India.
2
Department of Plant Molecular Genetics and Genomics, National Institute of Plant Genome Research New Delhi, India.
3
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, University of Queensland St Lucia, QLD, Australia.
4
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
5
Department of Plant Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya Mohanpur, India.
6
Genetic Resources Centre, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture Ibadan, Nigeria.
7
Centre for Integrated Legume Research, University of Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
8
The John Bingham Laboratory, National Institute of Agricultural Botany Cambridge, UK.
9
Law School, University of Western Australia Perth, Australia.
10
CLES, Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter Exeter, UK.
11
Forage Crop Research Institute, Japan Grassland Agriculture and Forage Seed Association Nasushiobara, Japan ; Department of Plant Genetics and Breeding, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University Beijing, China.
12
Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University Murdoch, WA, Australia.
13
Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama in Huntsville Huntsville, AL, USA.
14
Plant Genomics and Breeding Center, Federal University of Pelotas Pelotas, Brazil.
15
Department of Agriculture, Forests, Nature and Energy, University of Tuscia Viterbo, Italy.
16
Global Crop Diversity Trust, Platz der Vereinten Nationen Bonn, Germany.
17
Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI, USA.
18
Section of Crop and Ecosystem Sciences, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis Davis, CA, USA.
19
Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California Riverside, Riverside, USA.
20
Agrogenomics Research Center, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences Tsukuba, Japan.
21
University of Exeter Exeter, UK.
22
Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University Wales, UK.
23
International Rice Research Institute Manila, Philippines.
24
Biotechnology and Crop Genetics, Crops for the Future Semenyih, Malaysia.
25
National Center for Soybean Biotechnology and Division of Plant Science, University of Missouri Columbia, MO, USA.
26
Grains Research and Development Corporation Kingston, ACT, Australia.
27
Department of Plant Breeding, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sundvagen, Sweden.
28
Plant Genome Mapping Laboratory, University of Georgia Athens, GA, USA.
29
Department of Horticulture, USDA-ARS, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI, USA.
30
Agrobiodiversity and Biotechnology Project, Centro International de Agricultura Tropical Cali, Columbia.
31
Department of Agricultural Sciences Bologna, Italy.
32
Center of Excellence in Genomics, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics Patancheru, India.
33
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Environmental Sciences Division, Climate Change Science Institute Oak Ridge, TN, USA.
34
National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Institute of Crop Science Tsukuba, Japan.

Abstract

Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security.

KEYWORDS:

breeding; climate change; crop improvement; genomics; stress tolerance

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