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Poult Sci. 2015 Oct;94(10):2445-55. doi: 10.3382/ps/pev243. Epub 2015 Aug 17.

Evaluation of yeast dietary supplementation in broilers challenged or not with Salmonella on growth performance, cecal microbiota composition and Salmonella in ceca, cloacae and carcass skin.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Physiology and Feeding, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 118 55, Athens, Greece kmountzouris@aua.gr.
2
Department of Nutritional Physiology and Feeding, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 118 55, Athens, Greece.
3
Lallemand Animal Nutrition, 19 rue de Briquetiers, BP 59, 31702, Blagnac, France.
4
Department of Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 118 55, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

The dietary supplementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii was evaluated in broilers challenged or not challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) using a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Depending on yeast inclusion at 0 (C) or 1 × 10⁹ cfu/kg diet (Y) and SE challenge (0 or log 6.3 cfu/bird) on d 15, the experiment had four treatments C, Y, C-SE, and Y-SE, respectively. Each treatment had seven replicate floor pens with 15 broilers. Growth performance responses were determined weekly and overall for the 5 week experimental period. Salmonella levels and prevalence in ceca, cloacae, and carcass skin were determined by culture procedures, while cecal microbiota was determined by real time PCR. Yeast supplementation had no effect (PY > 0.05) on growth performance. For the overall post SE-challenge period (i.e., wk 3 to wk 5), Salmonella reduced body weight gain (BWG) (PSE < 0.001), feed intake (FI) (PSE = 0.032), and the European production efficiency (EPEF) factor (PSE = 0.005). Broilers Y-SE had higher (P < 0.001) overall BW gain compared to C-SE ones. Overall mortality was 2.14% and did not differ (P > 0.05) between treatments. Reduced Salmonella levels in the cloacae (P = 0.014) and on the breast skin (P = 0.006) and lower prevalence on the neck skin (P = 0.007) were noted for treatment Y-SE compared to C-SE. Yeast supplementation did not have an effect (P > 0.05) on cecal microbiota composition at d 1 and d 21 post SE-challenge. On the contrary, SE-challenge reduced cecal levels of total bacteria (PSE = 0.002), E. coli (PSE = 0.006), Bifidobacterium spp. (PSE = 0.006), Bacteroides spp. (PSE = 0.010), and Clostridial populations belonging to cluster I and cluster XIVa, (PSE = 0.047 and PSE = 0.001, respectively) on d 1 post SE-challenge. At 21 d post SE-challenge, only the levels of cecal Lactobacillus spp. (PSE = 0.001) and Bifidobacterium spp. (PSE = 0.049) were reduced compared to the non SE-challenged groups. In conclusion, yeast supplementation in SE challenged broilers (Y-SE) was beneficial for growth performance and reduced Salmonella presence compared to C-SE ones. The disturbance of cecal microbiota balance by SE merits further investigation for potential implications in gut and overall bird health.

KEYWORDS:

Saccharomyces; Salmonella; broiler; carcass; gut microbiota

PMID:
26286998
DOI:
10.3382/ps/pev243
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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