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BMC Genomics. 2015 May 28;16:418. doi: 10.1186/s12864-015-1646-6.

Early life microbial colonization of the gut and intestinal development differ between genetically divergent broiler lines.

Author information

1
Wageningen Livestock Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands. dirkjan.schokker@wur.nl.
2
Cobb Europe BV, Boxmeer, The Netherlands. Gosse.Veninga@cobb-europe.com.
3
Central Veterinary Institute, Lelystad, The Netherlands. stephanie.vastenhouw@wur.nl.
4
Central Veterinary Institute, Lelystad, The Netherlands. alex.bossers@wur.nl.
5
Central Veterinary Institute, Lelystad, The Netherlands. freddy.debree@wur.nl.
6
Wageningen Livestock Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands. lucia.kaal@wur.nl.
7
Central Veterinary Institute, Lelystad, The Netherlands. annemarie.rebel@wur.nl.
8
Wageningen Livestock Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands. mari.smits@wur.nl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Host genetic makeup plays a role in early gut microbial colonization and immune programming. Interactions between gut microbiota and host cells of the mucosal layer are of paramount importance for a proper development of host defence mechanisms. For different livestock species, it has already been shown that particular genotypes have increased susceptibilities towards disease causing pathogens. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of genotypic variation on both early microbial colonization of the gut and functional development of intestinal tissue. From two genetically diverse chicken lines intestinal content samples were taken for microbiota analyses and intestinal tissue samples were extracted for gene expression analyses, both at three subsequent time-points (days 0, 4, and 16).

RESULTS:

The microbiota composition was significantly different between lines on each time point. In contrast, no significant differences were observed regarding changes in the microbiota diversity between the two lines throughout this study. We also observed trends in the microbiota data at genus level when comparing lines X and Y. We observed that approximately 2000 genes showed different temporal gene expression patterns when comparing line X to line Y. Immunological related differences seem to be only present at day 0, because at day 4 and 16 similar gene expression is observed for these two lines. However, for genes involved in cell cycle related processes the data show higher expression over the whole course of time in line Y in comparison to line X.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest the genetic background influences colonization of gut microbiota after hatch in combination with the functional development of intestinal mucosal tissue, including the programming of the immune system. The results indicate that genetically different chicken lines have different coping mechanisms in early life to cope with the outside world.

PMID:
26017153
PMCID:
PMC4446945
DOI:
10.1186/s12864-015-1646-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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