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Nanomedicine (Lond). 2015;10(13):2051-61. doi: 10.2217/nnm.15.52. Epub 2015 May 8.

Magnetoelectric 'spin' on stimulating the brain.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular Biology & Pharmacology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA.
2
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174, USA.
3
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
4
Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
5
Neuroscience Centers of Florida Foundation, Miami, FL 33124, USA.
6
School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

The in vivo study on imprinting control region mice aims to show that magnetoelectric nanoparticles may directly couple the intrinsic neural activity-induced electric fields with external magnetic fields.

METHODS:

Approximately 10 µg of CoFe2O4-BaTiO3 30-nm nanoparticles have been intravenously administrated through a tail vein and forced to cross the blood-brain barrier via a d.c. field gradient of 3000 Oe/cm. A surgically attached two-channel electroencephalography headmount has directly measured the modulation of intrinsic electric waveforms by an external a.c. 100-Oe magnetic field in a frequency range of 0-20 Hz.

RESULTS:

The modulated signal has reached the strength comparable to that due the regular neural activity.

CONCLUSION:

The study opens a pathway to use multifunctional nanoparticles to control intrinsic fields deep in the brain.

KEYWORDS:

magnetoelectric nanoparticles; nanoengineering the brain; noninvasive brain stimulation

PMID:
25953069
PMCID:
PMC4910966
DOI:
10.2217/nnm.15.52
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Financial & competing interests disclosure The authors acknowledge partial financial support from National Science Foundation (NSF) awards #ECCS-1408063 and IIP-1237818, NIH DA #R01DA034547-01 and Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Microelectronics Activity (DMEA) under contract #H94003–09–2–0904. The authors have no other relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript apart from those disclosed. No writing assistance was utilized in the production of this manuscript.

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