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Brain Inj. 2015;29(7-8):859-65. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2015.1004759. Epub 2015 Apr 27.

Prevalence, natural course and predictors of depression 1 year following traumatic brain injury from a population-based study in New Zealand.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Auckland , New Zealand .

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Depression is common post-TBI, yet has not been studied longitudinally, nor at a population level. This study examined prevalence of depression in a population-based sample across the first year post-TBI.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Prospective follow-up of 315 adults (>16 years) with assessments (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, DSM-IV criteria) at 1-, 6- and 12-months post-TBI. Demographic and injury-related predictors of depression at 1-year post-TBI were also explored.

RESULTS:

The number of individuals identified as depressed reduced significantly between baseline and 12-months post-TBI from 21-12.4% using the HADS and 49-34% using DSM-IV criteria; with only 10 of the 28 individuals initially meeting criteria on the HADS continuing to do so at 12-month follow-up. Meeting HADS depression criteria was linked to pre-morbid depression and/or anxiety; while those meeting DSM-IV criteria were older, but not significantly so.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest depression is common post-TBI and that clinicians/researchers use caution in its diagnosis, as existing criteria have significant overlap with common TBI sequels.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; population-based; traumatic brain injury

PMID:
25914943
DOI:
10.3109/02699052.2015.1004759
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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