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J Neurosci. 2015 Feb 11;35(6):2830-7. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4294-14.2015.

Behavioral oscillation in priming: competing perceptual predictions conveyed in alternating theta-band rhythms.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, P.R. China.
2
Department of Psychology, Peking University, and PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, P.R. China huan.luo@pku.edu.cn luohuan@gmail.com.

Abstract

The brain constantly creates perceptual predictions about forthcoming stimuli to guide perception efficiently. Abundant studies have demonstrated that perceptual predictions modulate sensory activities depending on whether the actual inputs are consistent with one particular prediction. In real-life contexts, however, multiple and even conflicting predictions might concurrently exist to be tested, requiring a multiprediction coordination process. It remains largely unknown how multiple hypotheses are conveyed and harmonized to guide moment-by-moment perception. Based on recent findings revealing that multiple locations are sampled alternatively in various phase of attentional rhythms, we hypothesize that this oscillation-based temporal organization mechanism may also underlie the multiprediction coordination process. To address the issue, we used well established priming paradigms in combination with a time-resolved behavioral approach to investigate the fine temporal dynamics of the multiprediction harmonization course in human subjects. We first replicate classical priming effects in slowly developing trends of priming time courses. Second, after removing the typical priming patterns, we reveal a new theta-band (∼4 Hz) oscillatory component in the priming behavioral data regardless of whether the prime was masked. Third, we show that these theta-band priming oscillations triggered by congruent and incongruent primes are in an out-of-phase relationship. These findings suggest that perceptual predictions return to low-sensory areas not continuously but recurrently in a theta-band rhythm (every 200-300 ms) and that multiple predictions are dynamically coordinated in time by being conveyed in different phases of the theta-band oscillations to achieve dissociated but temporally organized neural representations.

KEYWORDS:

behavioral oscillation; predictive coding; priming; rhythmic sampling; theta phase; time-resolved behavior

PMID:
25673869
PMCID:
PMC6605623
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4294-14.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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