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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2015 Mar 19;370(1664):20140090. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2014.0090.

Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

Author information

1
International Laboratory of Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), and Center for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM), University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada isabelle.peretz@umontreal.ca.
2
International Laboratory of Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), and Center for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM), University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
International Laboratory of Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), and Center for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM), University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Department of Psychiatry, McGill University and Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing.

KEYWORDS:

fMRI; music; neural overlap; speech

PMID:
25646513
PMCID:
PMC4321131
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2014.0090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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