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Int Health. 2015 Sep;7(5):348-53. doi: 10.1093/inthealth/ihu098. Epub 2014 Dec 30.

Outcomes of a school-based intervention on rabies prevention among school children in rural Sri Lanka.

Author information

1
Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, 060-8638, Japan.
2
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
3
Rabies Control Unit, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
4
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
5
Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, 060-8638, Japan tamashiro@med.hokudai.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Sri Lanka, one of the major challenges in rabies control is to manage the dog population and subsequently to protect people, especially young children, from dog bites.

METHODS:

In 2009, an educational-entertainment campaign called 'Rabies Edutainment 4 Kids' was introduced in the school curricula in rural Sri Lanka to improve practices on rabies prevention and pet care among school children, and to evaluate its effectiveness through pre- and post-tests.

RESULTS:

The level of rabies knowledge, attitude and practice among the pupils was dependent on their responses to a survey, and scores were significantly improved both among the study and control groups after the intervention. A lecture accompanied by a rabies awareness leaflet was much more effective in improving knowledge than the leaflet alone. The type of intervention and language used was significantly associated with the score increment (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The threat of rabies to pupils in Sri Lanka would be reduced if they are given appropriate information on rabies prevention as a part of the school curricula. Close collaboration with local education offices is key to successful implementation of school-based rabies control programmes, which is, in turn, crucial to the eradication of rabies from Sri Lanka.

KEYWORDS:

Awareness programme; Edutainment; Intervention; Rabies; School children; Sri Lanka

PMID:
25549632
DOI:
10.1093/inthealth/ihu098
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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