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Front Psychol. 2014 Dec 10;5:1437. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01437. eCollection 2014.

Social signal processing for studying parent-infant interaction.

Author information

1
CNRS, Institut des Systèmes Intelligents et de Robotiques, UMR 7222, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris, France.
2
CNRS, Institut des Systèmes Intelligents et de Robotiques, UMR 7222, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris, France ; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital Paris, France ; Laboratoire de Psychologie Clinique et Psychopathologie, Psychanalyse, Paris René Descartes University Boulogne, France.
3
CNRS, Institut des Systèmes Intelligents et de Robotiques, UMR 7222, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris, France ; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital Paris, France.
4
Laboratoire de Psychologie Clinique et Psychopathologie, Psychanalyse, Paris René Descartes University Boulogne, France.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Infant Mental Health Unit, Geha Hospital, Tel Aviv University Tel Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

Studying early interactions is a core issue of infant development and psychopathology. Automatic social signal processing theoretically offers the possibility to extract and analyze communication by taking an integrative perspective, considering the multimodal nature and dynamics of behaviors (including synchrony). This paper proposes an explorative method to acquire and extract relevant social signals from a naturalistic early parent-infant interaction. An experimental setup is proposed based on both clinical and technical requirements. We extracted various cues from body postures and speech productions of partners using the IMI2S (Interaction, Multimodal Integration, and Social Signal) Framework. Preliminary clinical and computational results are reported for two dyads (one pathological in a situation of severe emotional neglect and one normal control) as an illustration of our cross-disciplinary protocol. The results from both clinical and computational analyzes highlight similar differences: the pathological dyad shows dyssynchronic interaction led by the infant whereas the control dyad shows synchronic interaction and a smooth interactive dialog. The results suggest that the current method might be promising for future studies.

KEYWORDS:

RGB-D sensor; early parent–infant interaction; feature extraction; multimodal computational analysis; social signal processing; synchrony

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