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Virus Res. 2015 Feb 2;197:35-47. doi: 10.1016/j.virusres.2014.12.006. Epub 2014 Dec 12.

Studying classical swine fever virus: making the best of a bad virus.

Author information

1
College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014, China. Electronic address: jiwei_yunlong@126.com.
2
Department of Computer and Information Science, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458, USA.
3
College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014, China.
4
College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014, China. Electronic address: hchqiang@126.com.

Abstract

Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease that affects domestic pigs and wild boars. Outbreak of CSF can cause heavy economic losses to the pig industry. The strategies to prevent, control and eradicate CSF disease are based on containing the disease through a systematic prophylactic vaccination policy and a non-vaccination stamping-out policy. The quest for prevention, control and eradication of CSF has moved research forward in academia and industry, and has produced noticeable advances in understanding fundamental aspects of the virus replication mechanisms, virulence, and led to the development of new vaccines. In this review we summarize recent progress in CSFV epidemiology, molecular features of the genome and proteome, the molecular basis of virulence, and the development of anti-virus technologies.

KEYWORDS:

CSFV life cycle; Classical swine fever virus; Epidemiology; Protein functions; Reverse genetics; Virulence

PMID:
25510481
DOI:
10.1016/j.virusres.2014.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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