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Nat Commun. 2014 Nov 11;5:5392. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6392.

Mind-controlled transgene expression by a wireless-powered optogenetic designer cell implant.

Author information

1
Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering, ETH Zurich, Mattenstrasse 26, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland.
2
Département Génie Biologique, Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUTA), 74 Boulevard Niels Bohr, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France.
3
1] Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering, ETH Zurich, Mattenstrasse 26, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland [2] Faculty of Science, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland.

Abstract

Synthetic devices for traceless remote control of gene expression may provide new treatment opportunities in future gene- and cell-based therapies. Here we report the design of a synthetic mind-controlled gene switch that enables human brain activities and mental states to wirelessly programme the transgene expression in human cells. An electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) processing mental state-specific brain waves programs an inductively linked wireless-powered optogenetic implant containing designer cells engineered for near-infrared (NIR) light-adjustable expression of the human glycoprotein SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase). The synthetic optogenetic signalling pathway interfacing the BCI with target gene expression consists of an engineered NIR light-activated bacterial diguanylate cyclase (DGCL) producing the orthogonal second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which triggers the stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent induction of synthetic interferon-β promoters. Humans generating different mental states (biofeedback control, concentration, meditation) can differentially control SEAP production of the designer cells in culture and of subcutaneous wireless-powered optogenetic implants in mice.

PMID:
25386727
PMCID:
PMC4241983
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms6392
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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