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Biomaterials. 2015 Jan;36:33-43. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.08.039. Epub 2014 Oct 11.

A strategy to passively reduce neuroinflammation surrounding devices implanted chronically in brain tissue by manipulating device surface permeability.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, James LeVoy Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building (SMBB), 36 S. Wasatch Drive, Rm. 3100, Salt Lake City, UT 84117, USA.
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, James LeVoy Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building (SMBB), 36 S. Wasatch Drive, Rm. 3100, Salt Lake City, UT 84117, USA. Electronic address: Patrick.Tresco@utah.edu.

Abstract

Available evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by immune cells are likely responsible for the negative sequela associated with the foreign body response (FBR) to chronic indwelling implants in brain tissue. In this study a computational modeling approach was used to design a diffusion sink placed at the device surface that would retain pro-inflammatory cytokines for sufficient time to passively antagonize their impact on the FBR. Using quantitative immunohistochemistry, we examined the FBR to such engineered devices after a 16-week implantation period in the cortex of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results indicate that thick permeable surface coatings, which served as diffusion sinks, significantly reduced the FBR compared to implants either with no coating or with a thinner coating. The results suggest that increasing surface permeability of solid implanted devices to create a diffusion sink can be used to reduce the FBR and improve biocompatibility of chronic indwelling devices in brain tissue.

KEYWORDS:

Cytokine; Electrode; Finite element analysis; Foreign body response; Inflammation; Macrophage

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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