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J Immunol. 2014 Jul 15;193(2):469-75. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1400432.

Influenza-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: toward a universal influenza vaccine.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; and.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; and World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, North Melbourne, Victoria 3051, Australia.
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; and skent@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

There is an urgent need for universal influenza vaccines that can control emerging pandemic influenza virus threats without the need to generate new vaccines for each strain. Neutralizing Abs to the influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoprotein are effective at controlling influenza infection but generally target highly variable regions. Abs that can mediate other functions, such as killing influenza-infected cells and activating innate immune responses (termed "Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC]-mediating Abs"), may assist in protective immunity to influenza. ADCC-mediating Abs can target more conserved regions of influenza virus proteins and recognize a broader array of influenza strains. We review recent research on influenza-specific ADCC Abs and their potential role in improved influenza-vaccination strategies.

PMID:
24994909
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1400432
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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