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Cell Cycle. 2014;13(7):1063-77. doi: 10.4161/cc.28433. Epub 2014 Mar 6.

Genetics and epigenetics of aging and longevity.

Author information

1
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Moscow, Russian Federation; Institute of Biology; Komi Science Center of Russian Academy of Sciences; Syktyvkar, Russian Federation; Syktyvkar State University; Syktyvkar, Russian Federation.
2
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Moscow, Russian Federation; Institute of Biology; Komi Science Center of Russian Academy of Sciences; Syktyvkar, Russian Federation.
3
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science; School of Medicine; University of California at Davis; Davis, CA USA.
4
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Moscow, Russian Federation; Federal Clinical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Immunology; Moscow, Russian Federation; Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry; Moscow, Russian Federation; First Oncology Research and Advisory Center; Moscow, Russian Federation.
5
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Moscow, Russian Federation; Federal Clinical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Immunology; Moscow, Russian Federation; The Biogerontology Research Foundation; London, UK.

Abstract

Evolutionary theories of aging predict the existence of certain genes that provide selective advantage early in life with adverse effect on lifespan later in life (antagonistic pleiotropy theory) or longevity insurance genes (disposable soma theory). Indeed, the study of human and animal genetics is gradually identifying new genes that increase lifespan when overexpressed or mutated: gerontogenes. Furthermore, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms are being identified that have a positive effect on longevity. The gerontogenes are classified as lifespan regulators, mediators, effectors, housekeeping genes, genes involved in mitochondrial function, and genes regulating cellular senescence and apoptosis. In this review we demonstrate that the majority of the genes as well as genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that are involved in regulation of longevity are highly interconnected and related to stress response.

KEYWORDS:

aging; epigenetics; evolution; genetics; longevity

PMID:
24603410
PMCID:
PMC4013158
DOI:
10.4161/cc.28433
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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