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Cancer Biol Ther. 2013 Dec;14(12):1092-7. doi: 10.4161/cbt.27350. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

Author information

1
Cell Stress Biology; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Buffalo, NY USA.

Abstract

Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

KEYWORDS:

aging; cancer; geroconversion; gerosuppression; mTOR; rapalogs; rapamycin

PMID:
24345884
PMCID:
PMC3912031
DOI:
10.4161/cbt.27350
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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