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Science. 2013 Aug 16;341(6147):789-92. doi: 10.1126/science.1240925. Epub 2013 Aug 1.

A long noncoding RNA mediates both activation and repression of immune response genes.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA.

Abstract

An inducible program of inflammatory gene expression is central to antimicrobial defenses. This response is controlled by a collaboration involving signal-dependent activation of transcription factors, transcriptional co-regulators, and chromatin-modifying factors. We have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that acts as a key regulator of this inflammatory response. Pattern recognition receptors such as the Toll-like receptors induce the expression of numerous lncRNAs. One of these, lincRNA-Cox2, mediates both the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes. Transcriptional repression of target genes is dependent on interactions of lincRNA-Cox2 with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and A2/B1. Collectively, these studies unveil a central role of lincRNA-Cox2 as a broad-acting regulatory component of the circuit that controls the inflammatory response.

PMID:
23907535
PMCID:
PMC4376668
DOI:
10.1126/science.1240925
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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