Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neural Eng. 2013 Oct;10(5):056001. doi: 10.1088/1741-2560/10/5/056001. Epub 2013 Jul 26.

Toward a fully integrated wireless wearable EEG-NIRS bimodal acquisition system.

Author information

1
GRAMFC - Inserm U1105, UFR of Medicine of University of Picardie Jules Verne, F-80036 Amiens, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Interactions between neuronal electrical activity and regional changes in microcirculation are assumed to play a major role in physiological brain activity and the development of pathological disorders, but have been poorly elucidated to date. There is a need for advanced diagnostic tools to investigate the relationships between these two physiological processes.

APPROACH:

To meet these needs, a wireless wearable system has been developed, which combines a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system using light emitting diodes (LEDs) as a light source and silicon photodiodes as a detector with an integrated electroencephalography (EEG) system.

MAIN RESULTS:

The main advantages over currently available devices are miniaturization and integration of a real-time electrical and hemodynamic activity monitor into one wearable device. For patient distributed monitoring and creating a body-area network, up to seven same devices can be connected to a single base station (PC) synchronously. Each node presents enhanced portability due to the wireless communication and highly integrated components resulting in a small, lightweight signal acquisition device. Further progress includes the individual control of LEDs output to automatically or interactively adjust emitted light to the actual local situation online, the use of silicon photodiodes with a safe low-voltage power supply, and an integrated three dimensional accelerometer for movement detection for the identification of motion artifacts.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The device was tested and validated using our enhanced EEG-NIRS tissue mimicking fluid phantom for sensitivity mapping. Typical somatotopic electrical evoked potential experiments were performed to verify clinical applicability.

PMID:
23893764
DOI:
10.1088/1741-2560/10/5/056001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for IOP Publishing Ltd.
Loading ...
Support Center