Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Inj. 2012;26(11):1360-71. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2012.667592. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

The influence of gender on the injury severity, course and outcome of traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
NRZ Neurological Rehabilitation Center, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. renner@sachsenklinik.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the independent association of gender with injury severity, clinical course, pituitary dysfunction and outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort, analysis of a data sub-set collected as part of the nation-wide database 'The Structured Data Assessment of Hypopituitarism after TBI and SAH'.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Four hundred and twenty-seven patients following TBI were observed from acute care through neurological rehabilitation. Outcome was measured by Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), employment status and living situation post-injury. As a secondary outcome measure anterior pituitary function was assessed.

RESULTS:

There were no differences in injury severity between men and women. Age had a significant effect on the GCS score (p = 0.0295), but gender did not (p = 0.4105). The outcome was equivalent between men and women once corrected for age. Logistic regression revealed that gender had no effect (p = 0.8008), but age (p = 0.0021) and initial injury severity (p = 0.0010) had an effect on the GOS. After correcting for pre-injury living situation and employment only initial injury severity (p = 0.0005) influenced GOS. Pituitary insufficiency was not affected by sex or age.

CONCLUSION:

Gender does not seem to influence the course and outcome of TBI. Outcome parameters were affected foremost by initial injury severity and by age, but not by sex.

PMID:
22853194
DOI:
10.3109/02699052.2012.667592
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center