Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz). 2011 Oct;59(5):379-84. doi: 10.1007/s00005-011-0135-0. Epub 2011 Jul 26.

Transitional B cells: how well are the checkpoints for specificity understood?

Author information

1
Centre for Immunology and Infectious Disease, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Blizard Institute, UK. a.vossenkaemper@qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

It is crucial for the immune system to minimise the number of circulating mature self-reactive B cells, in order to reduce the potential for the development of autoantibody-related autoimmune diseases. Studies of animal models have identified two major checkpoints that ensure that such cells do not contribute to the naïve B cell repertoire. The first is in the bone marrow as B cells develop and the second is in the spleen; B cells that are released from the bone marrow as transitional B cells go through more stringent selection in the spleen before they develop into mature naïve B cells. Transitional B cells and their maturation have mostly been studied in mice. However, recent studies characterised human transitional B cells and found considerable differences to current models. In this review, we will consider these differences alongside known differences in mouse and human splenic function and ask whether human transitional B cells might develop along a different pathway.

PMID:
21789626
DOI:
10.1007/s00005-011-0135-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center