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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2011 May;92(5):841-3. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2010.12.004.

Proof of concept for perturbation-based balance training in older adults at a high risk for falls.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bucknell University, 701 Moore Avenue, Lewisburg, PA 17837, USA. k.bieryla@bucknell.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the efficacy of perturbation-based balance training (PBBT) on time to stabilization (TTS) after a nonstepping response to a postural perturbation in older adults at a high risk for falls.

DESIGN:

Single-subject design. Participants completed 4 baseline tests, 1 month of PBBT, and posttraining tests both 1 week and 1 month after training.

SETTING:

Assisted-living facility.

PARTICIPANTS:

Older adults (N=5; mean ± SD age, 85±6.5y; residents of assisted-living facility) at a high risk for falls.

INTERVENTION:

PBBT involved 3 sessions a week for 4 weeks. Each session involved standing for 50 trials on a pneumatic instrumented moving platform that translated 0 to 0.08m forward or 0 to 0.13m backward in approximately 390ms (average velocity, 0.25m/s).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Time to stabilization of center of pressure (COP) after a perturbation on the moving platform.

RESULTS:

TTS of COP was 41.6% shorter than baseline tests (P<.001) 1 week after completing PBBT and 46.3% shorter than baseline tests (P<.001) 1 month after completing PBBT.

CONCLUSIONS:

PBBT improved TTS after a postural perturbation in older adults at a high risk for falls, and these improvements were retained for 1 month.

PMID:
21530733
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2010.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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