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J Psychosom Res. 2011 Apr;70(4):328-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2010.11.010. Epub 2011 Jan 15.

A pilot study of cognitive behavioral stress management effects on stress, quality of life, and symptoms in persons with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Author information

1
University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present pilot study was designed to test the effects of a 12-week group-based cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on stress, quality of life, and symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We hypothesized that participants randomized to CBSM would report improvements in perceived stress, mood, quality of life, and CFS symptomatology from pre- to postintervention compared to those receiving a psychoeducational (PE) seminar control.

METHOD:

We recruited 69 persons with a bona fide diagnosis of CFS and randomized 44 to CBSM and 25 to PE. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Profile of Mood States (POMS), Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI), and a Centers for Disease Control (CDC)-based CFS symptom checklist pre- and postintervention.

RESULTS:

Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant Group×Time interaction for PSS, POMS-total mood disturbance (TMD), and QOLI scores, such that participants in CBSM evidenced greater improvements than those in PE. Participants in CBSM also reported decreases in severity of CFS symptoms vs. those in PE.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that CBSM is beneficial for managing distress, improving quality of life, and alleviating CFS symptom severity.

PMID:
21414452
PMCID:
PMC3073706
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpsychores.2010.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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