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Atten Percept Psychophys. 2010 May;72(4):1032-44. doi: 10.3758/APP.72.4.1032.

Reduction of the flash-lag effect in terms of active observation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. ichikawa@L.chiba-u.ac.jp

Abstract

In the present study, we investigated how observers' control of stimulus change affects temporal and spatial aspects of visual perception. We compared the illusory flash-lag effects for automatic movement of the stimulus with stimulus movement that was controlled by the observers' active manipulation of a computer mouse (Experiments 1, 2, and 5), a keyboard (Experiment 3), or a trackball (Experiment 4). We found that the flash-lag effect was significantly reduced when the observer was familiar with the directional relationship between the mouse movement and stimulus movement on a front parallel display (Experiments 1 and 2) and that, although the unfamiliar directional relationship between the mouse movement and stimulus movement increased the flash-lag effect at the beginning of the experimental session, the repetitive observation with the same unfamiliar directional relationship reduced the flash-lag effect (Experiment 5). We found no consistent reduction of the flash-lag effect with the use of a keyboard or a trackball (Experiments 3 and 4). These results suggest that the learning of a specific directional relationship between a proprioceptive signal of hand movements and a visual signal of stimulus movements is necessary for the reduction of the flash-lag effect.

PMID:
20436198
DOI:
10.3758/APP.72.4.1032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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